Pro Tips

2 days ago

MDM Coaching

MikeSomething new is coming for MDM Coaching... BowlersMart Orlando Pro Shop Inside Boardwalk Bowl ...

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7 days ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Lane Surfaces

A lot of people don’t realize there are different types of lanes. Lane materials have evolved over the years to maintain durability and promote cost effectiveness. Back before the 1990s, about 90% of lanes in the US were wood. Wood lanes were popular because they used to be cost effective, even though there was a lot of maintenance required. There wasn’t a prevalent synthetic option. Wood has a tendency to be soft, making your bowling bowl hook more. When reactive resin came out, wood ended up being an extreme scoring condition – either very high or very low. In the late 70s, synthetics came around. Some centers installed synthetic overlays on top of wood lanes to extend their life. They are naturally much harder (like a table top) and bowling balls didn’t hook as much.

A big reason that bowling balls started to advance faster had to do with the lane surface getting harder. As time went on, different companies saw an opportunity to invest into different types of lane surfaces. AMF/Bowlero got into the lane bed industry and came out with two surfaces: HPL and SPL. They were designed to mimic wood surfaces without the high maintenance costs. The mechanic didn’t have to resurface the lanes every 2-3 years. The most popular lane surfaces now from Brunswick: Pro-Anvil. They are distinctive because they have tracer marks down the lane on the 15 and 10 board. The predecessor is the Brunswick Anvil from the 90s, which some centers still have. Pro-anvil is one of the hardest surfaces around.

An important note about all lane surfaces is that they play differently as time goes on. Every time a ball goes down a lane it wears on the surface. A 20-year-old surface, even of the same material, will give you much different ball reaction because of what it has endured. Very rarely nowadays do people replace lanes – it’s an extremely expensive process that make take years to recoup.

If you are a competitive bowler who wants to be better at understanding why you bowl good in certain centers, I recommend learning about that center’s lane material and age. Where the ball physically contacts the surface 100% dictates how your ball rolls. Very similar to a racing track – if there’s an older track that hasn’t been maintained well vs a brand-new one, the tires will react differently. Your ball roll 100% gets affected by the age and type of the surface. When I bowled regionals more, I’d call and ask the center about the material and age of the lanes so I could game plan. It helped me consider the right ball surface and layouts. I could go in prepared by knowing some of the variables. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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2 weeks ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip: Finger Adjustments to Change Ball Reaction

Subtle differences in your hand positioning can make a big difference in your bowling game. More specifically, changing where your non-bowling fingers (your pointer finger and pinky finger) are in your setup will change the way the ball comes off your hand. The most common adjustment people make with their fingers is by tucking their pinky. If you try to put your hand in the ball and keep your pinky flat, then tuck it, you’ll notice that your ring finger tends to curl towards the palm while you tuck. This adds just a little of extra pressure on your ring finger and lets the ball roll off your hand with more side tilt. If you’re throwing it good but not having good ball reaction, tucking your pinky may get the ball spinning through the front of the lane.

Another option to adjust is by spreading your pointer and pinky away from the middle fingers, creating more forward roll with less backend. Little tweaks with your non-bowling fingers can allow you to release the ball differently on different conditions and maximize ball reaction. If you have questions about how to do this, consult your PSO or a certified coach #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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3 weeks ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Corner Pins

Spare shooting is the glue to your game. Missing a 7-pin or a 10-pin costs you 11 pins off of your possible score. The more you cover spares, the more confidence you’ll have to your next shot. Overall, your frustration level will be lower. But it is dramatically overlooked in the game today because strong equipment has increased strike percentage significantly. At a higher level, when you see people struggle with lane conditions, it becomes apparent how critical good spare shooting is to the game. The majority of lessons I give with bowlers for bowlers between 150 and 180 is because they do not make their spares very consistently.

Corner pins are right next to the gutter and can be a little intimidating because people think that you have a very small margin of error to make a single pin. The bowling ball is 8.5 inches wide and the bowling pin at the widest base is 4.75 inches. If you think about it in terms of room on the lane, you realistically have about 12 inches of miss area when you’re going for a single pin.

So what’s the key to good spare shooting? It’s about repetition. Some people don’t practice their spares enough to be repetitive enough. When going for a single pin or corner pin, the way that I figure out where to stand is to go for same pin ten times in a row. If you miss one of those shots, you start over until you make ten 10 pins or ten 7 pins in a row. Everybody is different, so there isn’t one ideal place to stand. You can see in the video, you can see that I stand more left for my 10 pin (board 27) and more right (board 11) for my 7 pin. That’s my specific spot, you could be on board 26, 31, or others. It doesn’t matter where you stand, as long as you can be consistent. You can figure out where to stand and then get comfortable repeating shots.

There are a plethora of drills and other recommendations that can help you learn to shoot spares. There are some standards to look at when working on spares. I will always recommend anybody to throw a spare ball, especially at corner pins. Some people will throw a reactive ball end over end to kill the ball’s hook. I’d rather keep things simple. Spare balls are reasonably priced and have a plastic coverstock. They do not hook unless there are extreme dry conditions. Urethane balls can also be acceptable, as they hook a little but not as much as a reactive ball.

If you find yourself making below 75% of spares, I’d recommend working on this at least once a week. If you are disciplined enough, bring only your spare ball in for practice that day. Try ten 10 pins in a row and ten 7 pins a row. You can also play low ball: in one game, you’re trying to score as low as possible. If you can make the 10 pin off of a full rack and the 7 pin off a full rack, you’d get 2 per frame. Therefore, a perfect game would be 20. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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4 weeks ago

MDM Coaching

Awesome bowling John! It was fun to see you shoot so well. Love that Hammer Web Tour Hybrid BowlersMart.com #brandsofbrunswick #nothinghitslikeahammer #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart ...

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4 weeks ago

MDM Coaching

Another MDM Coaching sighting at the pba championships! #mdmcoaching #pba ...

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4 weeks ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Backswing Height - Just Because It Looks Cool, doesn’t mean it’s necessary

I get asked a lot in the pro shop and out on the lanes while bowling how I get my backswing so high. I also get asked how bowlers on TV get their backswings so high. The answer is relatively straightforward, but it may not actually be helpful. Not everyone needs a high backswing to be successful. The reason why some bowlers’ backswings get that high is because their upper body is more forward and lower in their approach, which creates like an optical illusion. It looks muscled but it’s not.

One thing I learned at Kegel Training Center Master Coaching Program is that there are a lot of people who generate a high backswing the wrong way – which means they open their rotator cuff, pull the ball up into the swing, and then close it on the way down. The professional bowlers usually don’t open their rotator cuff, and if they do it’s minimal. Opening and closing can lead to injury and introduces unnecessary muscle.

While the benefits of a high backswing are more momentum, speed, and power, there are a lot of people who succeed without it. A good example of not needing one is PBA up and comer Nick Pate. He bowled great in the PBA league without a high backswing. Another good example is Wes Mallot. He’s the tallest and biggest guy on tour and doesn’t need to get his swing high for power.

If you want to work on getting your backswing higher, you should consult a certified coach. It can cause a shoulder injury and is too risky to work on without help. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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1 month ago

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HammerMike Moore 268-279-279 with his Web Tour Hybrid! 826!
#HammerBowling #WebTourHybrid
#NothingHitsLikeAHammer 🔨
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1 month ago

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MDM Coaching spotted at the PBA League! #mdmcoaching #Coolwick ...

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1 month ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Interchangeable Thumbs

When you are getting in to bowling more heavily and building an arsenal, one of the biggest variables for your release is having a consistent thumb hole. Interchangeable thumbs were introduced 25 years ago and were revolutionary. They provide even more consistency than the thumb slugs that we recently reviewed because you can make one thumb hole that fits every bowling ball that you buy. There are a couple of systems that grip companies have developed. One is a tab system with a lock at the bottom. Another has a screw-in type like a bottle cap. These companies have perfected their systems over time. If you are a feel bowler and you need the thumb to be exactly the same from ball to ball, it’s highly recommended to invest into one of these systems.

If your thumb changes, you can have multiple interchangeable thumbs with different sizes vs using tape to get the feeling just right. I’ve seen people have 5-6 different thumbs. The only downside to consider with these products is that they are made out of plastic, which can wear out. USBC rules say everything has to be made out of something non-metallic, which means it’s less durable than something made with metal. Costs for these systems can vary. If you end up investing in this product, go to a qualified Pro Shop Operator who is experienced in installing them. If they are installed incorrectly, you’ll have issues getting the insert in and out, locking it, or breaking it due to excessive force, so do your research. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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1 month ago

MDM Coaching

Evaluate your game from all angles! The newest tool in my toolbox is a front facing camera. This view allows us to analyze your release, finish position, and other factors to develop a plan for success. This is only available for lessons booked at Aloma. Send me a message if you're interested in setting up a time to work together. #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart ...

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1 month ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Every Shot is a Chance to Learn

This past weekend, I went to Tampa to bowl a four-game sweeper. I had the unfortunate luck of not bowling well for three games. In the video, you can see that I shot 300 game after that rough start. I made a decision late in the block to throw urethan and it gave me better ball reaction. I think of tournaments as a series of decision-making opportunities and I had exhausted all of my available options – every other ball in my bag, hand positions, and speed changes. Urethane was the only thing left and it turns out that it worked. If I had given up on trying things, I would have lost a lot more money that day. Pulling out a strong performance at the end allowed me to cash in a couple of side options.

Even when you’re struggling, you can always think about your shot making as a chance to learn. For example, I learned on Sunday that it’s probably better to throw a urethane ball in that part of the house to control ball reaction. When it comes to making decisions, and you choose the wrong decision, don’t get overwhelmed and upset, just try something else. Realize that it’s not a big deal to struggle in a tournament sometimes and you can learn from your mistakes. Whenever you feel like you’re digging yourself a hole with score, shotmaking, etc the worst thing to do is to lean into it and feel defeated when there’s still time left. Bowling bad in a tournament isn’t the end of the world and there will always be another opportunity, so use this for learning. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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2 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Fueling your body for competition

If you’re a competitive bowler, it’s worth considering how you fuel your body to maximize performance. What you eat or drink in tournaments may impact your mental consistency and physical ability. There are already enough variables in bowling - you don’t want to make the game harder than it needs to be.

Obviously, eating can be largely driven by personal preferences. I don’t like to eat while bowling, and I don’t like to have heavy meals right before I bowl. I’ll eat a protein bar or a small breakfast before a tournament so that I don’t feel overly full. Eating a combination of carbs and protein can provide you long lasting energy, like bananas and peanut butter, or protein shakes. I also try to drink a lot of water so that I don’t get sluggish while I’m bowling. After bowling, especially if it’s a multiple day tournament, I eat carbs to refuel, but try not to eat too much. I know other people who eat big breakfasts so that they don’t have to eat for the rest of the day. That works for them, and you’ll need to figure out what works best for you.

Eating is a small component to staying focused in the moment, but it can be a variable that you can control. If you’re worried about your hunger, you may get distracted. Packing snacks can keep you fueled through the day and prepared for changes in energy. As you start to take this sport more seriously, consider consulting a nutritionist to get personalized recommendations. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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2 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Should you hinge or push?

In today’s bowling game where power and control go hand in hand, it’s important to evaluate how you start the bowling ball in your swing. A lot of people were taught to push the ball away from them in order to create a pendulum. With todays’ balls being much more aggressive, and often needing angle, you don’t have to push the ball to achieve an optimal roll anymore. If you analyze the best bowlers now, most hinge the ball vs pushing away. Hinging means dropping the ball to your side and walking by it, rather than pushing away and slowing down. If you push away, you force your feet to slow down because you have catch up to the ball. It can lead you to pull up in your backswing and pull down at the top. Simply dropping the ball into the swing can create a lot more efficiency. It will help you get to the line with more leverage and more time by using your legs to create power.

A good way to practice trying to hinge the bowling ball is to put yourself on video from the side and pay attention to where your bowling ball is going in the beginning of your approach. If your elbow or your ball is moving forward as you start your approach, vs downward, you are pushing the ball. Everybody has their own variation of a hinge, including the starting height, so there isn’t one prescription for success. You may need to try a few different ways to do this to find what’s right. But if you feel like you’re struggling to get to the line consistently, your release varies more than you want, or your weight distribution is teeter tottering in your approach, this could help you. It’s always good idea to have a second pair of eyes from a qualified coach, but especially with something like your pushaway. A very small change could significantly change your approach, making this very hard to recognize and work on by yourself. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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2 months ago

MDM Coaching

Woohoo! Congrats Jody Ellis Sheerer for winning the scratch event of the Airport Lanes womens 5 game sweeper. Keep it up Jody!What can we say?!? Thank you for the amazing turnout for our first Ladies 5-gamer. 49 ladies + a tough pattern = A Great Day! Winning the main event was Melanie Maguire and the Scratch option was Jody Scheerer! Looking forward to the next one ...

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2 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Dual Angle Layouts

Because we talked about performance drilling costs last week, I wanted to reshare my post on dual angle layouts. After your PSO has watched you bowl, found your PAP (positive axis point), and you’ve chosen a bowling ball to drill, the next step is to drill that high-performance bowling ball. It’s not as easy as it sounds. There are many methods to drilling a bowling ball today but the most popular one is a layout system that Mo Pinel created called the “Dual Angle” System. Once learned, it is a very simple way of understanding of how to fine tune your ball roll with specific layouts. The layout can change the ball’s roll but not its fundamental characteristics. This becomes important to understand when you start building an arsenal for yourself (3 or more bowling balls), as an avid league bowler in different places or different tournaments. If you have one ball at one center and you’re happy with that, drilling patterns won’t be as much of a factor. If you want multiple reactions from your equipment, you should take an interest in this process.

In the pictures, you’ll see bolded out angles on two of my personal bowling balls. These angles describe what shape the ball will have on the lane. Without getting too technical, because this isn’t a Pro Shop Operator Tip, I’ll briefly review the three components to the dual angle system – the Drill angle, the Pin to Positive Axis Point (PAP) distance, and the Vertical Axis Line (VAL) angle.

Drill Angle:
The drill angle is where the weight block is going to be shifted left or right when you’re looking at the bowling ball from pin to CG to mass bias. The drill angle basically tells you how early you want the ball to start rolling. The smaller the drill angle, the more right (left for a lefty) the core will be shifted from your grip, which creates an earlier roll.

Pin to PAP:
This determines how much overall flare you want on the bowling ball. Flare is the oil rings when you roll the ball down the lane and see the track. When you drill a strong pin to PAP distance, the track flare is much wider, so the track marks are much further away from each other. 3 and 3/8 to 5 inches is considered a strong pin to PAP distance, depending on a person’s rev rate. You want to take in to account how much rev rate a person has because if a person has a high rev rate, they won’t need a very strong pin to PAP distance.

VAL Angle:
Vertical Axis Line, in my opinion this is probably the most important factor when laying out a bowling ball. The VAL angle basically moves the weight block up and down on the bowling ball in relation to your grip. If you have a smaller VAL angle, your pin will normally be above your fingers. 30-45 degrees is normally a pin up VAL angle. A bigger VAL angle of 65 – 90+ degrees is going to be pin down drilling. What this determines is how is the ball going to react at its break point. A smaller VAL angle makes the bowling ball transition from the hook phase to the roll phase faster or “snap” when it hits the break point. As you would think, a larger VAL angle is going to be a smoother transition when it hits the break point. The reason why this is very important is if you drill a bowling ball for lane conditions that are not ideal for the VAL angle to react right (as an example, if you drill a bowling ball for a specific pattern like heavy or long, drilling a large VAL angle on the bowling ball means that your ball won’t change direction quickly and you’ll have poor pin carry).

Of course, there are exceptions to the rule but the drilling patterns in a dual angle system are about FINE TUNING the bowling ball’s characteristics. If you drill a super strong asymm sanded bowling ball with a nature to roll smoothly, like a Hammer Statement Solid, to transition quicker, it will transition a little quicker but it still won’t be as dramatic as if you drilled a Columbia 300 Black Chaos to transition quickly. Even if you drill them the same way, the second ball will change direction stronger down lane because of the characteristics of the ball. I highly recommend working with your Pro Shop Operator on your layouts and making sure he or she can watch you bowl. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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2 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Why does performance drilling cost so much?

I’ve been working in pro shops for over 15 years. Over that time, I have had many customers who are confused about why performance bowling balls cost so much to be drilled. Drilling a performance ball can cost anywhere from $50 to almost $100, depending on whether you use interchangeable thumbs or other accessories. I thought I’d try to demystify the cost – and explain what really goes into it when it seems like just putting holes in a ball.

There’s a lot of knowledge, training, and physics behind drilling a ball to achieve a specific roll. Your PSO needs to get the right things before we drill a bowling ball, including a person’s Positive Axis Point (PAP), Axis Tilt, and Axis Rotation. That takes time, and potentially a game or two out on the lanes and evaluating other equipment. In addition to understand these variables, the PSO needs to fit the ball to your hand correctly through accurate measurement and evaluation of a person’s flexibility or physical challenges. All of that needs to happen before we even start drilling. You get what you pay for. If you want the ball drilled correctly and to match up with your needs, normally a PSO in a bowling center that has knowledge and experience in this will take care of these things as part of their service.

With the new rules changing this year around weight holes, the layout of the bowling ball becomes significantly more important than in years past. When the driller doesn’t have the axis point or axis tilt and doesn’t take the time to find things that are important, they are taking a guess on a $200 bowling ball and hoping it rolls correctly. Given the importance of accuracy in this process, relying on a bowler’s input alone without a trained PSO observing is risky.

In addition to paying for highly skilled help, the business model of pro shops has changed dramatically over the last 20 years with the growth of the internet. Nowadays, bowling balls cost so little online, and leave small room for profit. Pro shops need to ensure there is enough margin to cover their operational costs and pay highly skilled employees. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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3 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Setting up to stay balanced

Balance is required from start to finish to bowl well at any level. When you set up, I recommend keeping the weight of the ball close to your personal center of gravity. I give a lot of lessons to people on strictly just staying balanced. The number one thing I look at is where their ball is in their setup. If the ball is away from their center of gravity, I’ll move their ball closer to them, and they immediately feel more confident.

Unfortunately, everybody is different, so there isn’t one magic spot in the setup where the ball should be. Some people like it close to their shoulder, some waist high, and some lower than their waist. There’s not a textbook ball stance in the set-up, because everyone’s center of gravity may vary. I do recommend that the bowler’s bowling shoulder and their head should be in line with each other (requiring some slight hip and shoulder movement to achieve that). From there, where they hold the ball is trial and error, but just start with the ball close to you and see what works. I recommend keeping your elbow outside of your body, so the ball doesn’t pull you down forward in the set up.

If feel like you’re wobbling to the line or teeter tottering, or you lose consistency in your approach, check where you’re starting your ball in the setup. You have to start off correctly to finish correctly. How do you stay balanced? #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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3 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Taking your time

When you’re playing any hand eye coordinated game like golf, darts, billiards, or bowling, you need to consider the time you take between shots. It’s important to have awareness of your overall timing, rhythm, and patience because sometimes these things are more important than the physical action of rolling a shot in competition. Personally, I can’t even count how many times taking my time has saved me from losing a match, helped me continue a string of strikes, or stay ahead of my opponent. At the highest level of competition, taking your time between shots is one of the most important things that you can do.

The ideal amount of time between shots really depends on the person. For me, picking up a ball immediately off the return and going again is too fast. At this point, I’ve developed a sense of knowing when I’m ready and when I’m not. If you start to focus more on your process than the actual tournament or lane pattern, you’ll have a sense of control over the environment without controlling your body too much. If I have a student who struggles with this, I may encourage them to walk around the bowler’s circle between shots, or take a drink of water to make sure enough time has passed to reset.

I have seen a lack of awareness of the time between shots cause problems for less experienced people in competition. Imagine that you’re in matchplay against an opponent that you need to win against move on and you’re up to bowl on both lanes. Your first shot, you throw a strike and your heart rate shoots up from the adrenaline. Then you go over to the next lane and immediately go into your pre-shot routine and throw the next shot. It’s not as focused or sharp, and you miss. That could be the difference between winning the tournament. You can’t control your opponent in these situations, just yourself. Taking your time in high stakes moments like this, or when you’re going for an honor score, is critical. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart #ripcoloniallanesorlando
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3 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: String Pins

This past weekend I was fortunate enough to bowl in a very unique tournament down in Naples Florida: The Qubica AMF “Some Strings Attached” tournament. Both Saturday and Sunday, we alternated bowling on string pins and free falling pins. String pins have a rope/cable attached to the pins that gets them set every time. The strings place them up and down inside the pinsetter machine. Qubica needed to run a high-level competitive tournament to see how bowlers did with these pins to make a case for them to be USBC sanctioned for tournaments and league bowling. String pin bowling is very cost effective compared to old school pinsetters that require more expert maintenance. If you’re curious, you can find many videos explaining the difference.

When I bowled this weekend, there was a noticeable difference in pin carry, spare shooting, and split conversion. In my personal opinion, the string pin bowling machines need to be tweaked a little bit to allow the pins to fall more “freely” than they did this weekend. Saturday’s invitational paid first place $5000. This brought out the cream of the crop in a 48-spot limited field of competitors. The string pin bowling vs free falling bowling, didn’t affect the level of competitiveness of bowling because we all had equal time in each scenario. It added an extra variable that us as competitors are not accustomed to, but we are used to managing different variables in competition. I was happy to have placed 12th in such a strong field.

While the overall scores were slightly higher on the string pins on Saturday and minimally higher on Sunday, my personal experience is that I did not average as high on string pin bowling vs free fall. For me, when the ball hit the pins, the strings decreased the impact. However, if this becomes a regular tournament, I will be the first to sign up because it’s a unique environment and a new challenge. If this becomes part of bowling in the future, we’ll all need to learn to adapt. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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3 months ago

MDM Coaching

Let me know if you want an MDM coaching shirt! Polos are $35 and t-shirts with the moo crew print around the logo are $20, with a combo deal if you buy both. Coolwick's breathable fabric is great for competition and practice!

#mdmcoaching #Coolwick
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3 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: 2020 rule changes on weight holes – it’s going to be OK!

Effective next week on August 1st, 2020, the USBC will be changing the rules on static weights and banning weight holes. The goal of this rule change is to limit the impact of the performance of the bowling ball. The purpose of a weight hole is to change the dynamics of the ball’s core. When you put a weight hole in today’s equipment, contrary to what many people believe, it is not to increase or decrease static weights. You can drill two bowling balls exactly the same, except adding a weight hole to one, and they will roll significantly differently down the lane. You can also increase or decrease the hook just by moving the location of the weight hole in the ball.

In my opinion, the reason why USBC is no longer allowing weight holes is to help even the playing field. While they are eliminating weight holes, they are increasing the allowable static weights from 1 oz to 3 oz. This increase will allow you to still drill the bowling ball with the center of gravity moved away from the grip to manipulate the weight block without needing to add a weight hole. However, even if you manipulate the core to shift the weight block away from the grip, you’re not removing a part of the ball and changing the core’s dynamics. So while you can change the way the ball rolls with this drilling, these rules limit your ability to change the ball from its intended purpose.

Whenever I drill a pin down bowling ball (where the top of the core is below my fingers), I add a weight hole. However, none of my pin up equipment has a weight hole. When the pin is lowered or the VAL (Vertical Axis Line) angle is increased, the flare potential decreases so it doesn’t hook very much. By adding a weight hole down by the thumb quadrant, I find that the ball flares more and rolls better. With the new rule change, I foresee that I’ll drill fewer pin down balls for my own game.

My personal take is that bowling balls today are so strong, with the dynamics of the cores and the strength of the coverstocks, that you do not need a weight hole to achieve a good ball roll. I think this rule is a step in the right direction, but I think there are other things that USBC could still address (like lane conditions). If it were completely up to me, I think a better way of going about this is not to worry about ball dynamics and instead focus on lane conditions to even the playing field. If you have equipment with a weight hole now, you will want to plan on plugging the hole at a local pro shop before throwing it again. That will make it legal for USBC. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #moocrew
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3 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Bowling a Doubles Event

This past weekend, I got a chance to bowl a doubles tournament in Tampa Florida, with my good friend Ashly Galante. Today’s pro tip is all about working as a team to bowl well together. Because many times I have seen in team formats or doubles formats that two great bowlers don’t always work together to bowl well. Bowling a doubles tournament, whether it’s male or female, professional or amateur, communication is the single most important factor. It’s often easier to communicate if your partner is a friend.

Last weekend, I started off bowling pretty well and Ashly struggled initially, but I was there to help and give her confidence in her moves. Then when the pattern got really ugly after game 3, she was there to keep me even keeled and encourage me. Watching her ball reaction helped me see what I needed to do to stay ahead of the moves. When things start to break down, the advantage of bowling doubles is having someone to talk to about transition, see ball reaction, and talk about which balls to throw. If Ashly and I didn’t have good communication, I don’t think we would have made the final match and finished second.

I’ve had similar success in other doubles tournaments where I noticed how important communication was to our success. I’ve been fortunate enough to bowl the PBA Member/Non-Member Regional tournament with Shawn Naumann over five years, when we got two first place and two second place finishes.

When it comes to picking a partner for a tournament, consider who you’ll have the best time with. If you’re worried about being competitive, try to analyze somebody’s game and choose someone with a similar ball roll to gather more information for your confidence and adjustments. Ultimately, doubles tournaments should give you the opportunity to enjoy the tournament because of your partner. When you don’t mesh with your partner, you’ll realize how important it is to prioritize the fun and communication over everything else. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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4 months ago

MDM Coaching

Bowled the TD doubles event today with Ashly Galante. Ended up 2nd place on a very demanding pattern. The two matches before the title match were nothing but exciting. First match against John Janawicz and Trevor Roberts came down to the 10th frame. Needing a strike in the 10th to move on and I nailed it. 10 back no doubter. 2nd match was against Jason Zook and Walter Ray Williams Jr again the match came down to the 10th. Ashly struck in the 9th giving me a chance to throw 3 strikes in the 10th to force Walter to show up. Got all 3 and Walter did not strike in the 10th which lead for us to win the match. It was an incredible match. The last match was not ideal unfortunately. Verity Francesca and Kristijonas Sergejevas stayed cleaned and Ash and I dug a hole early and never got out of it the whole match. Congratulations, they deserve the win for sure. Balls of choice:

🎳 Track Bowling Black Paradox
🎳Brunswick Bowling Prism Hybrid
🎳Brunswick Phantom
🎳 Columbia 300 Chaos Black
🎳 Ebonite Bowling Omni

#mdmcoaching #brandsofbrunswick #nothinghitslikeahammer #bowlersmart
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4 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Steady Head

Keeping a level, steady head while bowling is probably one of the most important fundamentals to establish. There are multiple reasons to keep a steady head while bowling – the main one is that it lets you keep your eyes on the target. If you dip forward and back in the approach or pop up at the foul line, your head will move, and your target will go from stationary to moving. While there are exceptions based on unique bowling styles – one of the most known is Walter Ray Williams Jr, arguably the most accurate bowler of all time – most great bowlers have a steady head from the beginning of the approach through the release.

In order to maintain a steady head, you need to focus on the foundation of your game: your footwork. You should never feel like you’re done critiquing your footwork and should always be working on it. If you lose it, or don’t pay attention to a solid foundation, you will not maintain a consistent approach or steadiness. If you’re not confident in your head staying still while walking, take a video from your phone or ipad from the side, filming the entire approach. Focus on whether your pushaway is causing you to dip forward or if you pop up the line. If your head is bobbing up and down or forward and back during your swing or at the foul line, you could slow your feet down. You might be running and getting your feet going to too quick in relation to your arm swing, causing you to muscle. You might not be using your legs and lunging enough. Lunging allows you to get deep at the line and create a lot more stability, so you don’t pop up. It’s almost always about the legs. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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4 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Stay in the Moment

This past weekend, I bowled my first tournament since the shut-down: The Florida State Open. It ended up being a pretty special weekend overall because I won All-Events Scratch and Handicap. Over 9 games, I put together a 2343 scratch series (260 average), with two 300 games in the team event. Winning this tournament is special because many of the best bowlers in Florida compete in it every year – this year you’ll see people like Matt McNeil, Sean Riccardi, and so many others on the results.

Staying in good rhythm from frame 1 until the final frame is critical to success in events like this one. It’s the feeling of flow that you get from the ball coming off your hand and executing a shot the right way over and over. A lot of times when someone is bowling well and they have a good rhythm or vibe going, they don’t really think about it. Here are some keys to staying in the moment based on my experiences and what I’ve observed as a coach:

- Follow your process: You need to go through the pre-shot routines motions, watch the ball going through the pins, and stay ahead of the moves almost automatically. You should get to a point that you don’t think about doing things, you just react. Focus on these foundations if you don’t have the right rhythm.
- Prepare: Achieving flow and consistent rhythm takes practice and the right fit. Personally, I tried to practice several times before states and adjusted my grip. It’s much easier to get into the flow and rhythm of a competitive environment when you go into the tournament confidently prepared.
- Don’t think too far ahead: When you’re bowling multiple day or multiple game tournaments (more than 3), many inexperienced competitors will get ahead of themselves if they start to bowl well. They think that one day or one game will vault them into the leaderboard, even if they still have multiple games left and their performance will suffer.
- Don’t dwell - It may be obvious but it’s hard – you can’t think about the good or the bad too much. You can’t hold on to that one good game when there’s more good games in front of you. You can flip this. If you have a bad day/game/tournament, the hardest thing to do in that moment is not focus on it and not get more frustrated and throw the whole event away.
- Keep your mind off of bowling when you’re not on the approach: On Sunday, I started off with a 300 game. It was very difficult for me to stay in the moment because I was thinking about the all-events total. My team helped me relax in the moment and kept me distracted by cracking jokes. They helped me stay in the moment and I shot another 300 the last game, even though I only needed a 170 to take over the all-events lead. It’s easier with teammates to stay distracted but you can find ways to do this in a singles event also – use your phone, play games, etc.

How do you get into and manage flow during competition? #mdmoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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4 months ago

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Giancarlo is new to bowling and purchased a package of lessons. We've been working on fundamentals of the game. After only 4 sessions, he shot a new high game of 229! I'm so proud of how far Giancarlo has come already and can't wait to see what he can do in the future. #mdmcoaching #moocrew #coachedbythemoo ...

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4 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Keep your hand behind the ball (release part 2)

Last week, we talked about loading or getting on the inside of the ball to create more angle. This week, we’re going to talk about staying behind the ball or using a “natural” release. This doesn’t require any extra ability or loading the wrist more than normal. If you’re bowling on a sport pattern, broken down house shot, or the fronts are dry, the best way to attack the lanes may be going straighter. This means that you’ll need to take your hand out of the ball and have a softer release that doesn’t hook as much.

A simple process to promote a softer release is to put more weight in your non bowling hand during the set up and allow your bowling hand to be as relaxed as possible before you start your approach. This should make you to stay behind the ball longer and at the release point, the thumb can come out a little bit quicker. There should be very little jerking motion to get the ball off your hand, getting it out on the lane softer and smoother. Pay attention to how much grip pressure you’re putting on your ball in the set up. Think about softness before you start. As you’re focusing on releasing the ball and looking at a target, try not do anything crazy with your hand and let it roll smoother. You’ll see less down-lane hook motion but more control. Between this natural release and loading your wrist, you should be prepared to manage almost any situation. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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4 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Loading up your release

When you’re bowling in league or competition, you may need to adjust release to the changing lane conditions. Every time a ball goes a lane, the lanes change very slightly. Over time, the shift could be dramatic. Changing your hand position can keep you in a bowling ball that is working well or allow you to adjust your feet and open up the lanes.

This tip is about when and how to “load” your wrist more than normal when you want to see the ball push through front part of the lane, change direction, retain energy, and hit harder on backend. The time to use a loaded wrist is usually when the lanes have started to transition and you’re moving farther left (as a right hander). You should consider it as an adjustment option when you need to create more angle through the front part of the lane so that the bowling ball doesn’t lose axis rotation (or energy) earlier on the lane. Loading your wrist more can be good or bad, depending on how you do it.

We’re not talking about “cupping the wrist” because in my opinion, that causes tension and could risk an injury, especially if it’s not a normal part of your game. So if this isn’t cupping, what is it? Loading your wrist means staying on the inside for a longer period. You can see an example of me doing this in the video. If you’d like to see a better illustration of staying on the inside of the ball and loading your wrist up more (I personally struggle to do this consistently), you can look at Wes Mallott, EJ Tackett, and Marshall Kent. You can practice different releases by doing foul line drills where you watch your hand come around the ball and follow through. If you’re doing it right, you’ll notice that the ball rolls differently on the lane – it’ll go longer before it hooks and come back harder.

Next week, we’ll talk about staying behind the ball during your release and when to use that approach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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5 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Getting back into it

There are many ways to get back into a game like bowling. One thing I’d recommend is beginning with foul lines drills to get your hand, swing, and legs back into the right position. You’re also going to want to re-establish your rhythm before tournaments and leagues restart. Everyone is coming out of a break and is likely off in some way. In recent conversations, I’ve been trying to help people figure out what has worked in the past to help them reach their pre-quarantine level.

As an example, I have a student that was very challenged in drifting left as a right hander. The student always used to walk to the right “towards her target”, obstructing her ball path and affecting her adjustments. It was a really big flaw that she worked really hard to change before quarantine, but she went back to old habits coming out of the break. To get back to where she was, I told her to start further right, where she’s comfortable and just focus on walking left. After a few sessions, she’s back to her more effective approach.

Everyone is going to have their own personal challenges and will need to figure out what will work. It may be hard to pinpoint what is wrong, unless you have a coach or PSO you can ask for help. If you can’t solicit help, take a video of yourself or do an inventory to think about what you’ve worked in the past. Move to a part of the lane where you’re most comfortable then move to a part of the lane where you’re less comfortable and see if anything is different in your approach. Practice where you’re comfortable to re-establish good habits.

There are a lot of moving parts in the game itself. Another factor worth some attention is your grip. It’s really important to get your thumb refitted or your span double checked because you probably lost callouses and maybe gained some hand flexibility on this break. I don’t recommend radical changes because your hand will likely go back to what it was pre-quarantine, but it might be appropriate to get your thumb regripped. Your PSO can help guide you. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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5 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Is the ball behind your head?

As you get back into the game, you may notice that your natural tendencies return, even if you worked hard to change them. I'm resharing this tip, as I think it's going to be important to use drills to ease back in and be aware of your swing direction.

One of the most important things that I evaluate as a coach is where the bowling ball is at the top of the person’s swing in relation to the bowler’s head. Ideally, the best spot for a ball to be is behind your head in both the upswing and downswing. There is an imaginary line called the “line of play” that starts with the pushaway, goes through the backswing, and back through the release. The reason why it’s important to have a straighter line of play is that for every little bit that your bowling ball is not behind your head, you have to compensate and redirect your swing back into the line of play in order to hit your target. This requires some muscle, which can become a liability, possible injury or simply poor mechanics that wear you out.

A lot of bowlers, even good bowlers, develop their game based on compensations but we need minimize them. One of the biggest challenges I personally have is getting the ball too far outside my body, creating too large of a figure 8 loop. If my ball gets too far on the outside, I have a tendency to pull it or my hand gets on the outside, I have very little tilt, and my ball doesn’t roll well. I constantly work on feeling like the bowling ball and my swing go behind my back. What’s more common is people who pull the ball inside their head or behind their back too much. This swing can cause the chicken wing or ball going around their body in the downswing. Both of these tendencies aren’t good.

In order to manage your line of play, you have to put yourself on video. If you’re too far right or left, I recommend drills that make you feel like you’re doing the opposite of what is natural. Since my ball goes too outside, I push to the right and feel it going behind my back. That gets me to straighter, even though it feels unnatural. As always, time with a qualified coach can be very beneficial. This is one of the hardest things to correct but can be very impactful to people’s games. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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5 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: To lean or not to lean?

Posture is something to pay attention to as you get back into bowling. If you had a tendency to get slouchy in the past, it may be something you do when you pick up a ball again. Be mindful so you protect your body and your game.

If you want to have proper leverage at the foul line, it all stems back to your set up position. We’ve gone over setting up, finish position, and trail leg in previous pro tips. Proper posture is the thread that ties them all together. Most people should aim for a little bit of spine tilt forward (10-15 degrees), avoiding standing straight up like a statue or leaning too far forward. Have your shoulders face the pins vs the ground while gradually getting lower by engaging your legs. I recommend starting with a slight knee bend. Much like picking up a heavy object, you want to focus on using your legs vs your lower back. You want your upper body to stay over your hips throughout your approach without having either your shoulders or your feet get too far ahead of one another. I’m demonstrating my own ideal posture in the top video, which includes engaging my legs while keeping my upper body facing the pins.

The bottom video is an example of what I see nearly 80% of my students do when they start. They like to lean forward, even if it’s not ideal for their body type. When they push away, the weight of the ball tends to cause people to tip. I have noticed that after working on posture during lessons, most students are able to establish better leverage at the foul line, which generates more speed and consistent motion. If your posture is not optimal, you will tend to feel like you can’t slide enough. Your lower back may hurt after bowling. You may feel like you’re dropping the ball or find yourself all around muscling.

The best way to evaluate your own posture is take a video of yourself bowling from a side view, like the one of me here. Keep in mind that every body type is different and will require a solution that works best for your game. For example, a shorter person needs to get their feet going to faster to generate speed. One way to do that is by getting your shoulders in front of your legs, resulting in a forward lean. If you can, I recommend working with a coach to identify your own ideal posture. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching
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5 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Legs

As we get back into the game, it's important to focus on the fundamentals. Everybody thinks that your upper body is the key to bowling well. However, in order to throw the bowling ball consistently and accurately, there are three key physical components that need to work correctly:

1) Direction/Arm Swing
2) Revs/Hand Rotation
3) Power/Legs

All three need to be working together in order to optimize performance and prevent injury. We’re going to focus on legs today because that’s where your power comes from. If you watch any hand/eye coordinated game that involves throwing an object, you’ll notice that energy is all derived from the athlete’s legs.

A lot of people I start working with try to create power with their upper body, resulting in an inaccurate release. When people don’t use their legs correctly (you might see someone leaning forward with their upper body vs getting low with their legs), a lot of time they might injure themselves, get tired a lot faster, or have trouble repeating shots. Relying on one’s upper body doesn’t create athletic ability.

So how do you use your legs properly in bowling? You need to have a consistent approach so that when you lunge in to your slide and transfer that energy to the ball, your upper body is calm and focused on hitting a target. Your legs start with your hips, so focus on your hips as you’re getting to lunge to the foul line. You should try not to lean with your upper body but your upper body should feel like it’s taller AND lower because you’re able to get closer to the ground by using your legs. Your knee should be continuing at the end of your slide to maintain momentum at the foul line. You should be more balanced at the foul line from one shot to another.

In the video, you’ll notice that in “Strong Legs” example my legs are calmer, and my trail leg is off to the side more to create a more balanced approach. In the other video, I end a little taller at the foul line and I didn’t look confidently balanced. The differences may seem subtle but the impact on my game is significant. A good way to understand how to use your legs properly is by doing a one-step drill focusing on lunging to the foul line. Your legs should feel a little sore after a practice session – like a good workout. #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #bowling #legs
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5 months ago

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Check out my conversation with Coach Shockley and Andrew Jensen about pro tip friday, coaching, and bowling!

BowlerSmart Richard Shockley Coaching Corner
Mike Moore is a USBC Silver Coach who has some history in bowling. Mike is a professional bowler that juggles running his MDM Coaching while managing our Orlando and Winter Park locations in Florida. He has been a great addition to our Bowlersmart family.
This week we sit down with Mike to discuss his #ProTipFriday posts he has and ask some of the usual questions we have. If you haven't seen them, he posts them every Friday in hopes to help us get better with our games.
Stop in and say hello and ask some questions!
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6 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Balance Arm (chat with me live about it!)

In resharing a recent post because I'll be talking to AJ Jensen and Richard Shockley about it live today at 1pm ET! facebook.com/events/s/coachs-corner-with-mike-moore/557806998465164/?ti=icl

You can practice this at home. Instead of the ball, use a free weight and practice swinging with your balance arm out. Or do a one step drill with a ball into pillows or a mattress.

It's critical to be balanced in order to hit your target consistently on the lane. The non-bowling side arm (also known as balance arm) is an often overlooked but very important part of the physical game. Using the opposite side to create leverage can affect swing, rev rate, and speed. However, many bowlers I work with aren’t even aware of their balance arm.

I’ve learned a lot about the impact of swinging a 14 – 16 lb object on only one side of the body since I’ve started coaching. While there are many ways to engage the balance arm effectively (reaching towards the wall, swimmers motion, bent elbow/forward shoulder, etc), it’s clear that bowlers need to create a force of resistance to maximize the transfer of energy from our body to the ball. I was working with a bowler a few months ago who was struggling to keep her balance and falling off to the right side almost every shot. We spent a session doing drills where I asked her to focus on reaching towards the wall as the first step in using her balance arm. By the end of the session, this student was posting the shot 60% of the time. Stabilizing the shoulders minimizes trunk rotation and increases consistency. For some, focusing on the balance side instead of the ball side can keep from overworking the ball.

I like to do one step drills to practice my release. In the video on the left, I’m not engaging my opposite side. It’s harder to stay balanced to post my shot and my ball is both slower and less accurate. On the right, I’m pushing my arm out towards the wall, which helps to keep my shoulders and hips in line with my target and gives me significantly more stability. If you’re struggling to repeat shots, think about how you’re utilizing your balance arm in your approach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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6 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Timing

When you restart bowling, you may notice that your timing has changed. Be aware of when you get to the line and where your ball is in the swing. Evaluate how this compares to your norm and whether you need to work on it - timing is one of those factors that can cause many issues that might be distracting from the root cause.

Timing is the most important factor in whether someone has a good or bad release. We use the term timing to describe the relationship between a bowler’s footwork and swing during their approach. Most bowlers who have an issue with consistent release have what is called “late timing”: when the bowler’s feet are at the foul line before the swing reaches the line. Everyone is different and ideal timing can vary person to person but most people want to strive for timing that is a little late – when the bowler reaches the foul line but the ball is just behind their slide foot ankle. You can see that demonstrated in the photos of me at colonial lanes.

Symptoms of late timing include: pulling the ball, missing target left, ball sticking on thumb, and “chicken winging”. What I have personally seen over five years of coaching, is that either the first step in the approach is too big or the bowler is too close to the foul line in their set up. If you think your timing is late, try adjusting where you start on the approach or the size of your first step. Working with an experienced coach is the best and fastest way to achieve results because every person is different. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching
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6 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Grip Pressure

I'm sharing a tip that will be relevant to many of us when bowling alleys reopen. Our hands may have changed during this break and we'll need to be mindful of not squeezing too much. I'd recommend checking with your pro shop operator of you have questions about your grip.

If you’re having trouble releasing the ball consistently, you might have too much “grip pressure”, which means that you’re squeezing the ball too much. The more competitive you get, the more important how you hold the bowling ball becomes. If somebody squeezes the ball too hard, they will release it differently almost every time. The whole goal in bowling, and any hand coordinated game, is to release the ball consistently and smoothly Therefore, your grip pressure should be very minimal. If you’re used to grabbing, a change to grip pressure could cause you to drop the ball more. You might need to go through several grip changes with your pro shop operator before you get it right.

Why do we squeeze? The majority of bowlers begin with house balls that aren’t fitted for them. People are trained from the beginning to grab the bowling ball. In order to learn to not grip the ball, the proper fit needs to be applied. This can be unsettling because the holes are tighter, and the span might be different. Good indicators that you are grabbing the ball too hard are blisters. You also might be extremely fatigued after a night of bowling because, if you’re grabbing, you’re using a lot more muscle in your upper body, causing you tire out faster. Check your grip pressure with a Pro Shop Operator or a trusted coach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iabowlersmart #coachedbythemoo #moocrew #moonation
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6 months ago

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MY FIRST PODCAST! Super excited about this! Couple of weeks ago Anthony Caso and Chris Polizzi asked me to be a guest on there YouTube channel. I of course was down to do it and here it is. Like, share and subscribe to there channel so they can grow and expand. #bowling #wearebowlersmart #mdmcoaching #protipmonday

youtu.be/gEnRY-kDNfYToday we have local bowler, proshop operator and regional champion Mike Moore! He tells us about his coaching, achievements and everything in between. Suppor...
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6 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Balance Arm

Here's a tip I previously shared that you can practice at home. Instead of the ball, use a free weight and practice swinging with your balance arm out. Or do a one step drill with a ball into pillows or a mattress.

It's critical to be balanced in order to hit your target consistently on the lane. The non-bowling side arm (also known as balance arm) is an often overlooked but very important part of the physical game. Using the opposite side to create leverage can affect swing, rev rate, and speed. However, many bowlers I work with aren’t even aware of their balance arm.

I’ve learned a lot about the impact of swinging a 14 – 16 lb object on only one side of the body since I’ve started coaching. While there are many ways to engage the balance arm effectively (reaching towards the wall, swimmers motion, bent elbow/forward shoulder, etc), it’s clear that bowlers need to create a force of resistance to maximize the transfer of energy from our body to the ball. I was working with a bowler a few months ago who was struggling to keep her balance and falling off to the right side almost every shot. We spent a session doing drills where I asked her to focus on reaching towards the wall as the first step in using her balance arm. By the end of the session, this student was posting the shot 60% of the time. Stabilizing the shoulders minimizes trunk rotation and increases consistency. For some, focusing on the balance side instead of the ball side can keep from overworking the ball.

I like to do one step drills to practice my release. In the video on the left, I’m not engaging my opposite side. It’s harder to stay balanced to post my shot and my ball is both slower and less accurate. On the right, I’m pushing my arm out towards the wall, which helps to keep my shoulders and hips in line with my target and gives me significantly more stability. If you’re struggling to repeat shots, think about how you’re utilizing your balance arm in your approach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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6 months ago

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Every Bowler Needs a Pre-Shot Routine

As most of us are home and unable to bowl, I'm sharing tips about things you can consider even while quarantined.

Bowling is all about repeating shots. If you are doing something differently every time you get up to roll a ball, you're not going to be very consistent. I hate when people say “it's 80% physical and 20% mental” or whatever they want to say. You have to give 100% physically in order to roll the ball properly and 100% mentally in order to focus on the task at hand. You need your mind to get you on "auto-pilot" so that your body can do what it's supposed to do every single time.

Every hand eye coordinated game has a Pre Shot Routine (PSR). You need make a checklist in your head of what you want to do before you roll a ball. From picking up the ball to visualizing it hooking on the lane, think about the things that get you set before you throw a shot.

After we’ve established fundamentals, I ask all of my students to create their own PSR. My own PSR is:

1. Dry my hand over the fan at the ball return (if they work lol)

2. Wipe the oil off the ball with a towel

3. Check my slide shoe with my hand to make sure I got nothing on it

4. Visualize my ball going down the lane and rolling into the pins the proper way

5. In my setup, I look down and my hand in the ball to make sure I'm in the correct position for what I want to do with the ball.

6. Before I start my approach, I take a deep slow breath to calm myself down and take my first two steps slow.

You can see in the video, that I’m doing my PSR in what is arguably the highest stress situation I’ve experienced. I was on my 34th strike in a row and needed to remain calm. While I didn’t get all 36 that night, I did go on to break the Florida State 4 game record (1179), which I could not have done without a consistent mental game. Given the power our minds have over our performance, it’s worth spending some real time developing strategies that support success, like a PSR. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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7 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Slumps

I'm resharing this previous tip because one slump buster is to take a break from the game, which most of us are forced to do right now. When we get back into it, we may need to remember these other strategies. Stay tuned for tips to stay sharp at home in the coming weeks.

When you’re playing a game that requires a lot of coordination, you’re going to fall into a dreaded slump at some point. My definition of a slump is finding that you aren’t doing as well as you used to do (just a few weeks or months ago) over the course a few sessions. When you feel like you’re in a slump, there’s a couple things that you need to do. First, remind yourself that it’s not going to last forever and that there are ways to get out of it. Extreme frustration prolongs a slump. Every professional and elite level bowler has experienced numerous slumps. They aren’t the end of the world – but it’s worth knowing that they are easy to fall in to and hard to get out of. How do you get out of it? 1) practicing more 2) practicing with a purpose (look at last week’s pro tip) or 3) taking a week or two off to recharge your batteries because you could be burned out.

My preferred way to get out of a slump is by practicing with a purpose. Because there are a number of things that could cause a slump (maybe a grip change, lack of bowling, trying a different technique, or something completely unrelated that has you distracted from your game), you may need a lesson with a certified coach to get a second pair of eyes on what’s going on. You could also use video to analyze yourself and decide what to work on. As I’m working through things, I try to tell myself that it will be a little better the next day because bowling is about a repetitive motion. There is no standard for how long this will last – could be weeks or months – and will depend on your situation. It won’t get better if you don’t get your head back in the game, so start there. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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7 months ago

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Who's your pick? BowlersMart.com ...

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7 months ago

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Check these guys out! Good friends and even better competitors. ...

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7 months ago

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Pro Tip Friday: Pin Down Layouts

Last week, we started talking about the difference between pin up and pin down layouts. Pin up layouts are quicker off the break point and better for fresher patterns depending on the pin to PAP location. This week, we will talk about pin downs and my opinion of when those should come into play, and how that changes after August 1st. On a very basic level, the pin down puts the weight block more in the palm of your hand, which reduces the flare rings on the bowling ball. Weight holes increase the differential, causing more flare, and adding more balance when a certain ball reaction is needed. After August 1st, without weight holes, you must use either closer pin to PAP layouts for symmetrical bowling balls or more aggressive asymm weight blocks in order to manage the reaction in pin down layouts.

So when should you use pin down layouts? When you start seeing the lanes transition to a point where you need to move to a new area but you’re bowling well and want to stay in the same zone. Pin down layouts allow you to stay in the same area because the ball reaction is not as aggressive. One consideration, if you don’t have a high rev rate or high ball speed, is that you normally want to change to a similar bowling ball with a pin down layout. Pin down layouts give you a slower, more controllable overall ball reaction. If you’re bowling on a flat pattern, you might want to start with a pin down ball and maintain a straighter angle, because it’s smoother.

When are pin down layouts less ideal? Longer or higher volume oil patterns (house or sport shots). Pin downs tend to be slow and sensitive, not reacting hard enough off the breakpoint. They are also less ideal when you’re trying to play deeper and there’s a lot of oil in the middle of the lane.

These are just guidelines - there is a lot of grey area when it comes to layouts. You need to pay attention to your ball reaction and how it goes through the pins. Talk to an experienced pro shop operator who can recommend layouts and equipment that suit your game. We’re here to help. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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7 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Pin Up Layouts

In a previous pro tip, we talked about dual angle layouts and went in to a broad explanation of what a “pin up” and “pin down” actually mean. Today we’re going to talk about general guidelines for using a pin up layout. These recommendations are based on my experience and may not apply universally. This should just be used generally as you’re thinking about a ball selection before competition, in the fill, or early in a game. I expect Pin Up layouts be used more often once weight holes become illegal starting 8/1.

Pin Up layouts:

- Create a quicker transition off the breakpoint like a “hockey stick”. This gives you control in many parts of the lane.
- They tend to make the ball stand up quicker and roll more forward. This creates a stronger overall movement towards the pins. Stronger entry angle can create better carry. The downside here is that they may roll out quicker.
- They are advantageous when moving left and playing more of the middle of the lane because of the steeper entry angle

There’s a second variable to consider: Pin to PAP distance. The closer the pin is to your PAP, the more the ball will flare within a certain distance: 3 3/8 pin to PAP to 5 inches pin to PAP distance. The higher the number, the less the ball flares, the lower the number, the more the ball flares. How do you use these numbers together? As an example, if you move left as the lane transitions, throw a ball with a smaller VAL angle and a longer pin to PAP distance so that it can recover off the pattern without flaring too early.

Generally:

🎳 When to use a pin up layouts: When you want to strong move off the backend when playing left or fresh oil patterns with a duller surface creating a more forward roll because it loses energy quicker.

🎳 When not to use a pin-up layout: When the lanes are transitioning if you want to stay in the same part of the lane or on lower volume flatter patterns (like the nationals team pattern the last couple of years). They may be too aggressive for these conditions.

Next week, we’ll talk about when to use a pin down layout. If you have questions about layouts, reach out to your PSO. We are happy to help, especially during this break from the lanes. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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7 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Accessories

When you get in to bowling more and want to take it to another level, there are several accessories that you should consider carrying in your bag at all times to help you get through different situations:

🎳 Tape, rosin bag, or powder can help you get a more consistent feeling shot-to-shot or week-to-week when your hand changes size. I personally use tape in the thumb hole that is white textured to help the ball grab me. Some people don’t like tape but, if your hand swells, the only other option is powder. Powder is so slick that you have to grab the ball harder. Everybody has a preference and you have to find what works for you and stick with it.

🎳 A towel can help you wipe the excess oil off the ball between shots.

🎳 Interchangeable sole bowling shoes with Velcro on the bottom allow you to change the sole and heel of your shoes to help you slide more or less from house to house.

🎳 Sanding pads (like Abralon) because as you learn about the importance of surface, it's good to have a couple of them in your bag to dull the ball down to hook earlier before competition starts

🎳 Screwdriver, scissors, or other tools

🎳 Wrist braces or athletic tape, if appropriate

🎳 New Skin, in case you get a blister

A general accessories bag is good to bring with you at all times. Because there are so many options, I recommended trying a bunch of things to see what works best for you. If you’re looking for guidance, feel free to reach out to a Pro Shop Operator. Especially as many centers are not open right now, we are happy to support in other ways. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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7 months ago

MDM Coaching

*LESSONS POSTPONED*

The bowling centers have decided that it's in everyone's best interest to temporarily close. That means that my lessons will be canceled for the time being. When we are back up and running, I'll be prioritizing rescheduling with those impacted during this time.

If you need tips in the meantime, I'm available for virtual coaching and will be posting my pro tips with advice to stay sharp off the lanes. If you have any disposable income, please consider supporting bowlersmart.com as these closures are impacting our staff and we want to be there for you when things reopen. I'd be happy to chat about equipment if you have any questions!

Stay safe and healthy.
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7 months ago

MDM Coaching

At this moment, the bowling centers are still open and lessons are scheduled as planned. However, there are new social distancing policies that should support our health and safety:

*Aloma and Boardwalk will not allow more than half the lanes to be in use at any given time, so you will bowl on one lane of a pair.

*Please minimize guests that join for your lessons so that we don't create a large group.

*If at any point you don't feel well, please cancel the lesson just to be safe. I will not charge a fee for rescheduling at this time, but please consider prepaying for your lesson so we can easily reschedule in the future.

I have also included the link to Florida Health, so you can stay up-to-date on how we are doing: floridahealthcovid19.gov/#latest-stats. Things are changing regularly and I'll keep you posted on any adjustments to my schedule or our operating hours in the future.

If you're stuck at home, let me know any questions you'd like me to cover in a future pro tip!
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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: When high fives are high risk

If your league is still bowling, you should find new ways to celebrate good shots to minimize the spread of any germs. Check out the video we made to show you some ideas - not all successful. Stay safe! #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #nohighfives #iambowlersmart
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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Practice with a Purpose

Getting better at anything takes practice. But there’s a difference between practicing with repetition vs practicing with a purpose. When you have hit a roadblock in your game, are trying to figure things out, or better understand why a coach told you to do something differently, practicing effectively will greatly improve your game faster than practicing repetitively (and practicing repetitively can reinforce bad habits). Effective practice normally only requires 2-4 games in one session. You will want to break down components of your game to focus on in these sessions. You can do this with drills, non-bowling ball approaches (like using a light weight to focus on technique), using a mirror so you know what you’re doing in the act of motion to the foul line at home, and the list goes on and on. Short and sweet, simple exercises can keep you from fatiguing yourself while building that skill much faster. Bowling a lot of games is really about maintaining endurance more than it is about fine tuning. I don’t recommend practicing for endurance unless you have a long tournament coming up.

When you’re trying to practice effectively, you shouldn’t worry about score and should only be thinking about one thing at a time. One example is if you are working on your pushaway, do your whole approach but don’t worry about where your ball is going off your hand because you’re not focusing on that. Much like working out in a gym, think about the impact. You can do fewer reps with more weight or do less weight with more reps. Both serve a purpose but in different ways. As always, consult a coach on what to work on and check out my past pro tips for ideas. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Grip Pressure

If you’re having trouble releasing the ball consistently, you might have too much “grip pressure”, which means that you’re squeezing the ball too much. The more competitive you get, the more important how you hold the bowling ball becomes. If somebody squeezes the ball too hard, they will release it differently almost every time. The whole goal in bowling, and any hand coordinated game, is to release the ball consistently and smoothly Therefore, your grip pressure should be very minimal. If you’re used to grabbing, a change to grip pressure could cause you to drop the ball more. You might need to go through several grip changes with your pro shop operator before you get it right.

Why do we squeeze? The majority of bowlers begin with house balls that aren’t fitted for them. People are trained from the beginning to grab the bowling ball. In order to learn to not grip the ball, the proper fit needs to be applied. This can be unsettling because the holes are tighter, and the span might be different. Good indicators that you are grabbing the ball too hard are blisters. You also might be extremely fatigued after a night of bowling because, if you’re grabbing, you’re using a lot more muscle in your upper body, causing you tire out faster. Check your grip pressure with a Pro Shop Operator or a trusted coach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iabowlersmart #coachedbythemoo #moocrew #moonation
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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Short patterns

For the final part of our generalized pattern recommendations, we’re going to talk about short patterns (under 36 ft). The good news is that short patterns normally force you into one part of the lane, like long patterns, so there’s a more straightforward place to start. They often force you play close to the gutter, far away from the pocket. Why is that? The pocket is at the 17.5 board. If you’re near the gutter, you are maximizing the distance that the ball needs to travel to reach the pocket. If it starts moving sooner because the pattern ends earlier on the lane, you need to make sure it doesn’t travel too far and go Brooklyn. Like everything else, there are a plethora of balls, angles, and layouts you can use on short patterns. And they can be very tricky depending on the volume. Short patterns can easily be the lowest scoring in tournaments.

For the last 20+ years, balls have been designed to maximize hook. If there is not enough oil on the lanes, balls become unmanageable on the backend and hook way too much. There are two main mistakes I see people make on short patterns: using urethane at the wrong time and using weak equipment thinking it will give them more control.

Urethane on Short: If there is low volume on a short pattern, urethane is a good choice for some bowlers. It allows you to control the hook front to back on the lanes. Urethane gives you the earliest hook. It doesn’t collect oil but pushes it down the lane. That can make short patterns play longer. If you don’t have a 450 rev rate, urethane probably shouldn’t be in your bag because you will struggle to carry. If you have trouble using urethane because you don’t have a high enough rev rate, you may want to consider a short pin layout because the core will rev up faster and your ball won’t change drastically on the back end (check out this short video on short pin vs urethane from Mo Pinel: www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YuL-v9fFM4). Unless you’re a 2-handed bowler, and urethane may always be your A-game, I don’t recommend starting with urethane on high volume short patterns.

Weak vs Strong Balls on Short: People often start with weak equipment thinking it will give them more control. Weak and shiny equipment retains energy through the front part of the lane and stores it until the backend. That means your ball will be the most powerful when it’s completely off the pattern, which could make it extremely difficult to manage and do the exact opposite of what you’d hope. You actually want to see your ball slow down as early as possible, so that it is controllable on the backend. If you’re not using urethane or there is high volume, I recommend starting with a strong asymm ball with a low grit coverstock. You’ll likely be more successful with this higher end equipment.

As always, watch what the lane is doing, how your ball is going through the pins, and how others attack the pattern to maximize your success. A million things can affect the conditions and you don’t want to be locked into one plan. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Really proud of Shawn Berry for winning all events at his first tournament in more than 20 years! He's put in a lot of work that resulted in him bowling 20 pins over average all weekend. ...

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8 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Why am I leaving 10 pins?

On an ideal strike, the ball hits four pins total in a ten-pin rack (1,3,5,9 for a righty/1,2,5,8 for a lefty). The reason we leave pocket 8s, 9s, and 10s (7s for lefties) is poor entry angle – either too much or too little. Entry angle is the angle that the bowling ball needs to enter the pocket in order to carry a strike. The USBC has determined that the optimal entry is between 4 and 6 degrees on board 17.5 for a right-handed player.

When a right-handed bowler is talking to me about leaving too many 10 pins (flip this tip to the other side of the rack for a lefty), I normally review entry angle. If your angle is off, the 6-pin will not cooperate and hit the 10-pin in the right way. If you hear people say that the ball is coming up behind the headpin and leaving a lot of 10s, that means that the ball is rolling in to the 3 pin heavier than the 1 pin, knocking the 6 pin a different way, causing it to hit the wall and go around the 10 pin. That kind of pin reaction will result in a ringing 10-pin. Flat 10s are a result of the ball hitting the pocket too straight, causing the 3-pin to throw the 6-pin in front of the 10-pin.

Visualize a fix to this problem: when the ball hits the pocket, you want it to roll in to the 8-pin of a full rack. Pay attention to how your ball hits the pins. If you see your ball drive in to the 8-pin, it will deflect properly and kick out the 10. If your ball is rolling in to the 9-pin at the back of the pin deck, you’ll leave more 10 pins because of lack of or too much entry angle. You need to watch your ball hitting the rack until it leaves the pin deck to understand where it is rolling.

If your ball is entering at the wrong angle, your ball could be too strong, your hand could be on the outside of the ball resulting in too little leverage, or your drilling pattern could cause the ball roll out too quickly. One option is to move left to where the ball won’t hook so early and roll out. While some people like to, I don’t recommend moving up or back on the approach because I think it affects people’s timing too significantly. The fix to the problem is going to be personal and based on a number of factors. The first step in correcting entry angle is to understand how your ball is hitting the pins so that you can adjust from there. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #bowling #tenpin #stone8
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9 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Skid, Hook, Roll

We'll be back with short pattern play next week - travel made it difficult this week. So we're reviving a pro tip that is very relevant to playing different patterns: ball motion. The terms skid, hook, and roll describe the three phases that the ball goes through after it leaves someone’s hand all the way to when it hits the pins. We’re constantly learning more about the science of ball motion because it’s essential to understanding pin carry. Your ball needs to skid, hook, roll at the right places on the lane in order to knock all of the pins down.

Everyone who bowls is used to leaving 10 pins or 7 pins. Some people think it’s “unlucky” to hit the pocket and leave a corner pin. Usually, it’s a result of the ball not getting in to the three phases correctly. When it comes off your hand, the ball needs to skid from the foul line to about 5 ft past the arrows. Then it should start slowing down and changing direction in the mid-part of the lane (the mids) when it enters the hook phase. Then the ball should roll at the end of the lane and drive through the pocket.

It’s very tricky to see this because the ball is only on the lane for a few seconds. However, it’s essential to train yourself to see these phases to understand how to adjust. If you’re leaving a lot of 10 pins (7s if you’re a lefty), 75% of the time, that’s because your ball didn’t skid enough through the front part of the lane and then it hooked early, rolled early, and lost energy when it hit the pins.

Just as bad, if your ball retains too much energy because it skids too far and hooks later down the lane, you could go through the nose or leave 9 pins (8 pins for a lefty). That’s the definition of “coming up behind the headpin” That’s because your ball can become too angular and change direction too sharply.

To understand ball motion better, you really need to pay attention to the ball all the way through the pins. If you don’t watch how the ball hits the pins, you won’t know why that pocket shot didn’t result in a strike. (You can learn more about why that’s important by looking back at the pro tip on entry angle).

If you are in a tournament or league and you see someone doing well, more likely than not, their ball motion is better than someone else’s. Watch this person to see where their ball is hooking. Conversely, if you see someone struggling, you can observe their ball motion to learn what to avoid. Certain lanes, centers, or conditions require the ball to hook earlier to carry, while others require that it go longer to carry. The chess game of bowling is watching what your bowling ball does and deciding how to use that information. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching
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9 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Medium Oil Patterns

In our second week discussing oil patterns, we’re shifting from the more straightforward long oil patterns that usually force you to keep your angles closer to the headpin, to medium oil patterns that can present a number of different ways to succeed or fail. These are by far the hardest oil patterns to bowl on for one main reason: there is no defined hook spot or angle that you need to play. When it comes to zone patterns (long or short), you’ll normally be in the same part of the lane regardless of volume etc. Medium oil patterns throw those guidelines out the window because a multitude of factors change the way these patterns play. The same exact pattern could and normally does play very differently based on lane surface and oil volume. I have bowled on many patterns that are described as medium that play much longer or much shorter. So, how do we attack an oil pattern that seems to be different every time you bowl on it? We’re not going to talk about layouts, surfaces, or where to bowl, but we’re going to focus on the importance of observation.

Start with a benchmark ball or your favorite ball to get a read. Throw a ball up the gutter, a ball in the track area, and a ball left of the track area (or right of the track if you’re a lefty). You need to watch your ball go down the lane and through the pins. Does it roll out? Does it hook too much? Keep an open mind and don’t try to force something that doesn’t work for your game. On a medium oil pattern, the rule of 31 can still be applied, but in my opinion, it’s just not useful in these scenarios as it is for short or long. It usually does a great job telling you where you might want to start but I sometimes see people be close minded about how patterns should play. If you’re not truly observing your ball, especially on medium patterns, you will struggle more than necessary. Do not get locked in to one plan – it doesn’t always work the way you’d expect. I’ve seen bowlers throw urethane and the strongest ball in the market and both can work.

Be aware that medium patterns are very susceptible to fast changes because everybody is often bowling in different part of the lanes. A lot of people will throw based on what their style and their own observations. Are you struggling to figure out how to adjust? Try watching others bowl. If I’m struggling, I will find the leader or someone else around me bowling well. I’ll see what they are doing and try to do it myself. Stay present, keep an open mind and you’ll be successful. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #moocrew
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9 months ago

Carlene Walker

I owe a big thanks to Mike Moore for drilling my new ball (Halo Pearl) and for giving me a tip in changing my stance! I bowled one of my best series during the Ladies Anchor Tournament this weekend. A 474 series, is excellent progress with a 128 average. Thanks!! 💪🏼 🎳 ...

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9 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Long Patterns

In the next couple of weeks, we’re going to tackle how to handle different length and volume oil patterns. In general, there a lot of variables that mean that the oil pattern can only serve as reference and a starting point. It’s critical that you observe your actual ball motion to tell you what’s really happening on the lanes. You may also want to talk to other people bowling or observe their ball going down the lane for more information. There are two main variables I recommend understanding when looking at a pattern graph to start: Length and volume. These two variables will likely dictate where you play on the lanes, what balls to throw, and the amount of surface to throw. We’ll first go over length and talk about volume as a secondary factor.

To start off this series, we’ll begin with longer patterns, which are defined as longer than 44ft. However, unless the center is very old and the track is very defined, most long patterns need to be played in the middle of the lane, towards the left, if you’re a right hander. Use the rule of 31 to determine the ideal breakpoint and set your target from there. For example, a 45 ft pattern means that I should subtract 31 from the length, and have my ball exit the pattern on board 14, which is in front of the 3 pin and only a few boards from the pocket. When your ball isn’t able to hook as much as it normally does, you need to play closer to the pocket. That’s because there isn’t as much time between the end of the pattern and the pins for the ball to make a big move. You’ll want to find a zone to start that lets you dry the lanes up and move left from there. If you’re bowling on a longer pattern but the volume isn’t high, you could hook the lanes, but “giving the ball to the right” probably won’t let it get back. While it’s true that there’s usually less hook on long, there’s a big misconception that these patterns mean that your ball will never hook. This will largely depend on the volume of oil and the topography of the lanes. As an example, the Paris pattern is 47 ft but your ball will probably hook early because the total volume is very low, which means you need to watch your ball from the front of the lane to the back and off the pin deck.

Now that you’ve determined your starting target based on length, let’s look at the volume. In my opinion, volume determines surface. If there’s a lot of volume (more than 30 ml), use grit of 500 or 1000, depending on your rev rate. If the volume is lower, you may not need as much as surface. Surface influences how early your ball hooks. If you use too much surface, the ball could hook too early and roll out before driving through the pocket, leaving flat 10s etc.

Longer oil patterns generally mean you should use an asymmetrical ball with a stronger core and solid coverstock to start. If you’re in a medium to low volume pattern, use a hybrid or pearl cover. You want your bowling ball to slow down and roll through the pocket. High performance asymms are usually required on long to make that happen. However, every time a ball goes down the lane, they change. Depending on the volume, you may jump into a strong symm ball later in the day. Many people have different opinions on how to handle oil patterns but we can all agree that the actual lane needs to be your guide. From what I’ve seen, length determines where to play on the lanes, volume determines which ball and surface, but use the system that works best for your game! #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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9 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: 2020 rule changes on weight holes – it’s going to be OK!

Effective August 1st, 2020, the USBC will be changing the rules on static weights and banning weight holes. The goal of this rule change is to limit the impact of the performance of the bowling ball. The purpose of a weight hole is to change the dynamics of the ball’s core. When you put a weight hole in today’s equipment, contrary to what many people believe, it is not to increase or decrease static weights. You can drill two bowling balls exactly the same, except adding a weight hole to one, and they will roll significantly differently down the lane. You can also increase or decrease the hook just by moving the location of the weight hole in the ball.

In my opinion, the reason why USBC is no longer allowing weight holes is to help even the playing field. While they are eliminating weight holes, they are increasing the allowable static weights from 1 oz to 3 oz. This increase will allow you to still drill the bowling ball with the center of gravity moved away from the grip to manipulate the weight block without needing to add a weight hole. However, even if you manipulate the core to shift the weight block away from the grip, you’re not removing a part of the ball and changing the core’s dynamics. So while you can change the way the ball rolls with this drilling, these rules limit your ability to change the ball from its intended purpose.

Whenever I drill a pin down bowling ball (where the top of the core is below my fingers), I add a weight hole. However, none of my pin up equipment has a weight hole. When the pin is lowered or the VAL (Vertical Axis Line) angle is increased, the flare potential decreases so it doesn’t hook very much. By adding a weight hole down by the thumb quadrant, I find that the ball flares more and rolls better. With the new rule change, I foresee that I’ll drill fewer pin down balls for my own game.

My personal take is that bowling balls today are so strong, with the dynamics of the cores and the strength of the coverstocks, that you do not need a weight hole to achieve a good ball roll. I think this rule is a step in the right direction, but I think there are other things that USBC could still address (like lane conditions). If it were completely up to me, I think a better way of going about this is not to worry about ball dynamics and instead focus on lane conditions to even the playing field. If you have equipment with a weight hole now and you still have it by 8/1/2020, you will want to plan on plugging the hole at a local pro shop. That will make it legal for USBC. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #moocrew
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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Goals

New year, new beginning, and time to set new 🎳goals for 2020. It’s very important to put down your goals and recognize what you accomplish. Goal setting doesn’t have to be anything crazy. Here are my recommendations:

🌟Set 4-5 goals throughout the year and individual goals for each tournament

🌟Goals should be a mixture of aspirational and achievable

🌟You shouldn’t be able to achieve all goals within 6 months – push yourself

🌟Focus on mostly performance-based goals that will help you achieve score goals

A performance goal could be something like repeating a shot consistently, spare shooting consistently, or improving swing direction. A score goal might be bowling your highest set or game, raising your average 5 pins, or getting at least a certain standing in a tournament. There are outside variables that you cannot control for score goals so these should not be the only thing that you pay attention to. You can’t control other people’s bowling, pin carry, lane conditions, etc. If you hit your performance goals, your score goals become more achievable.

The first 6 months of the year are usually filled with the state, local, and national association tournaments. Setting a new goal in each tournament is a good way to test yourself year-to-year. One of my personal goals for tournaments this year is to throw the best shots that I can possibly throw, convert all of my makeable spares, stay patient and not get ahead of myself. That’s what I did this past weekend bowling a doubles tournament with Walter Ray Williams 🐐. We won the doubles qualifying, which took us in to singles brackets. I won my first match but lost the second game, even though I bowled a clean 206. My opponent had better ball reaction. I didn’t win the overall tournament but I did meet my other goals.

I recommend talking to a coach about your goals to see if they seem right. What are you hoping to do in 2020? #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #moocrew #iambowlersmart
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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Great bowling Shawn Parisi ! ...

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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Mass Bias

The mass bias on a bowling ball is also known as the PSA – Preferred Spin Axis. I’ll use those terms interchangeably. The first ball with a mass bias came out in the early 90s (Comment below if you know the name!) Ball manufacturers figured out that if you change the shape of the weight block and make it asymmetrical, you can increase the overall hook of a bowling ball. You can learn more about different core shapes in a previous pro tip. This technology has been around a long time but we have only really understood its impact on ball roll recently.

Mass bias is the way we understand if a core is asymmetrical. It means that the mass of the ball is not directly under the Center of Gravity (CG). The PSA on an asymm ball is 6 and ¾ inches away from the pin, normally drawing a line between the pin and the CG. If you measure from the pin to the CG, you will find the PSA. It’s important that ball manufacturers started to indicate the PSA because where that axis is placed in relation to your PAP dramatically changes your ball’s motion on the lane.

When you drill bowling balls with asymmetrical weight blocks, it is just as important to know where the PSA will be placed as your pin to PAP distance. When you’re laying out a bowling ball, on the dual angle system designed by Mo Pinel, the mass bias is the first angle. Left to right from your thumb hole, is a good indication of how early or long the ball is going to go before hooking on the lane. If the PSA is way out to the right of the thumb hole, is an indicator of early hook on the lane. Vice versa, if the mass bias is near the thumb or drilled in to the thumb, your bowling ball will go quite a bit longer before it starts hooking.

Every time a ball is drilled, each hole should hit the weight block on the ball. So even symmetrical cores become asymmetrical after being drilled. But when it comes to drilling an asymmetrical bowling ball, you have a third variable to consider how to create the best ball motion. Mass bias numbers range just as much as the other numbers we discussed before like RG and Diff. Weaker mass bias is .08 - .011, medium is .012 - .016, and strong is.017 - .021. The numbers indicate how strong a weight block is and how much a ball will hook. You can see that these asymmetrical bowling balls are much more sensitive to drilling patterns. Therefore, you really have to have a PSO that understands this technology because you can affect a bowling ball’s roll negatively if you drill without understanding the variables. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Happy new year! What are your bowling resolutions this year? ...

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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Ball Behind Head

One of the most important things that I evaluate as a coach is where the bowling ball is at the top of the person’s swing in relation to the bowler’s head. Ideally, the best spot for a ball to be is behind your head in both the upswing and downswing. There is an imaginary line called the “line of play” that starts with the pushaway, goes through the backswing, and back through the release. The reason why it’s important to have a straighter line of play is that for every little bit that your bowling ball is not behind your head, you have to compensate and redirect your swing back into the line of play in order to hit your target. This requires some muscle, which can become a liability, possible injury or simply poor mechanics that wear you out.

A lot of bowlers, even good bowlers, develop their game based on compensations but we need minimize them. One of the biggest challenges I personally have is getting the ball too far outside my body, creating too large of a figure 8 loop. If my ball gets too far on the outside, I have a tendency to pull it or my hand gets on the outside, I have very little tilt, and my ball doesn’t roll well. I constantly work on feeling like the bowling ball and my swing go behind my back. What’s more common is people who pull the ball inside their head or behind their back too much. This swing can cause the chicken wing or ball going around their body in the downswing. Both of these tendencies aren’t good.

In order to manage your line of play, you have to put yourself on video. If you’re too far right or left, I recommend drills that make you feel like you’re doing the opposite of what is natural. Since my ball goes too outside, I push to the right and feel it going behind my back. That gets me to straighter, even though it feels unnatural. As always, time with a qualified coach can be very beneficial. This is one of the hardest things to correct but can be very impactful to people’s games. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart
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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Two years ago today we started Pro Tip Friday! MDM coaching now has over 2,000 followers, often reaching more than 30,000 people, thanks to your shares. Enjoy this outtake from where it all started at Colonial Lanes and let me know what we haven't covered that you'd like to know more about in the comments! 👇 #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #useyourhandsnotyourfeet #bowlernotsoccerplayer ...

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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Grip Pressure

If you’re having trouble releasing the ball consistently, you might have too much “grip pressure”, which means that you’re squeezing the ball too much. The more competitive you get, the more important how you hold the bowling ball becomes. If somebody squeezes the ball too hard, they will release it differently almost every time. The whole goal in bowling, and any hand coordinated game, is to release the ball consistently and smoothly Therefore, your grip pressure should be very minimal. If you’re used to grabbing, a change to grip pressure could cause you to drop the ball more. You might need to go through several grip changes with your pro shop operator before you get it right.

Why do we squeeze? The majority of bowlers begin with house balls that aren’t fitted for them. People are trained from the beginning to grab the bowling ball. In order to learn to not grip the ball, the proper fit needs to be applied. This can be unsettling because the holes are tighter, and the span might be different. Good indicators that you are grabbing the ball too hard are blisters. You also might be extremely fatigued after a night of bowling because, if you’re grabbing, you’re using a lot more muscle in your upper body, causing you tire out faster. Check your grip pressure with a Pro Shop Operator or a trusted coach. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iabowlersmart #coachedbythemoo #moocrew #moonation
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10 months ago

MDM Coaching

Looking for last minute gifts for the bowler in your life? Purchase a coaching session for a friend, loved one, or yourself! A gift certificate for a one hour session is $65 and completely tailored to that individuals needs. It can be scheduled at their convenience any available time slot in the next year at Aloma or Boardwalk. Discounts for youth bowlers and larger packages also available. Stop by the shop or message me to get one! #mdmcoaching #bowling #holidayshopping #moocrew #coachedbythemoo #moonation ...

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11 months ago

Papa Mike La Fountain

I was referred to Mike by Mike Demole. One of the best bowling decisions I’ve made in many years. His approach to drilling my balls wasn’t anything I’ve experienced before. I now have three balls drilled the same, fit the same but all set up to do something different. Mike has helped me find my passion for bowling again. Also, the two small tips helped as well. Thanks again to a true professional and class act. ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Look farther down the lane

In my lessons, I always ask people what they look at on the lane. 90% of the time, it’s at the arrows. Looking at the arrows may not be serving your game as well as you think, especially as the ball should be changing direction at the end of the pattern.

1) The arrows have been the main target for many bowlers for years. This worked well in the past when lanes were oiled 25-30 ft for a house shot. Your ball hooked a lot earlier than it does today.
2) Today’s lanes are oiled until almost 40 ft, which is much longer. The problem with having your focal part much earlier than the break point is that you might hit your target but not have the ball leave the pattern in an optimal place. You can hit the arrow at left, center, right, you might be accomplishing your goal. Down at 40 ft, your ball could be in a completely different spot.

So what should you look at? I’d recommend that your focal point is down lane at a pin or a range finder. This should make things a lot simpler because a lot of people hit their target at the arrows but miss down the lane. You need to create a line with 3 points that shows a path to consistently hit that target further down the lane where the oil pattern ends, starting at your feet (check out my earlier pro tip on targeting, based on kegel’s system). If the oil pattern is shorter, consider moving your eyes a little closer to the arrows. If you don’t want to change your focal point, make sure you have an awareness of what’s happening when the oil pattern ends so you can observe your ball path and motion. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Words don't describe how much I love my bowling community. This weekend I was recognized at the Orlando Youth City Award Ceremony for my accomplishments and how I've impacted the bowling community in the Orlando area. The presentation was honestly something I wasn't expecting and I am so humbled that everyone put so much effort into making it. I don't look at myself any different than a coach on Saturday mornings or any other person in a pro shop or any of the members on the Orlando board. All I want to do is grow the sport and do my job to the best of my ability. Check out the video because I can't even put into words how this all feels. ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Congrats Allison!So happy to be on the all city team with so many incredible women. It was amazing to celebrate with these awesome people and to bowl a no tap 300! Thanks to MDM Coaching for all of the support so far. ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Words don't describe how much I love my bowling community. This I was recognized at the Orlando Youth City Award Ceremony for my accomplishments and how I've impacted the bowling community in the Orlando area. The presentation was honestly something I wasn't expecting and I am so humbled that everyone put so much effort into making it. I don't look at myself any different than a coach on Saturday mornings or any other person in a pro shop or any of the members on the Orlando board. All I want to do is grow the sport and do my job to the best of my ability. Check out the video because I can't even put into words how this all feels.

I do not have the rights to the music.
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Words don't describe how much I love my bowling community. This weekend, I was recognized at the Orlando Youth City Award Ceremony for my accomplishments and how I've impacted the bowling community in the Orlando area. The presentation was honestly something I wasn't expecting and I am so humbled that everyone put so much effort into making it. I don't look at myself any different than a coach on Saturday mornings or any other person in a pro shop or any of the members on the Orlando board. All I want to do is grow the sport and do my job to the best of my ability. Check out the video because I can't even put into words how this all feels. ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Words don't describe how much I love my bowling community. Yesterday I was recognized at the Orlando Youth City Award Ceremony for my accomplishments and how I've impacted the bowling community in the Orlando area. The presentation was honestly something I wasn't expecting and I am so humbled that everyone put so much effort into making it. I don't look at myself any different than a coach on Saturday mornings or any other person in a pro shop or any of the members on the Orlando board. All I want to do is grow the sport and do my job to the best of my ability. Check out the video because I can't even put into words how this all feels.

I do not have the rights to this song.
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Awesome bowling! ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Launch Angle

Launch Angle in bowling is the angle of your bowling ball coming off your hand on to the lane. This angle is often determined by the target you’re looking at. This topic references back to one of my older pro tips about targeting, where I had three balls on the lane showing a targeting system that creates a straight line. When people are thinking about their angle off their hands, their targets are often wide. People stand too left and look too far right, creating a wider a launch angle than they need. That can result in over hooking, under hooking, and wet dry conditions becoming more extreme. If your angles are more open than you need, you have to manufacture and muscle the swing to keep the ball in line of play. If your angle is too straight, the ball might hook too early. There is a window you want to shoot for – you don’t want too much or too little.

So how should you think about your launch angle? From the foul line to the arrows, your feet to your target probably don’t need to be more than a few degrees of angle to your target. If you’re sliding at 20, your target at the arrows should probably be 14-16. If you’re standing on 20 and looking at second arrow, that angle is likely too steep. The best way to really see if the ball is coming off your hand too steep is to take a video and watch how quickly the ball is going to the right or left. As always, I’d recommend an extra set of eyes from a qualified coach to help evaluate your angle. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart #moocrew #moonation
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

If you want to support Small Business Saturday by getting a coaching gift certificate or booking a lesson yourself, use the "Book Now" link, send me a message here, or comment and I'll be in touch on Monday after I'm done bowling the Make It Reign Challenge this weekend. Every time you buy coaching or share my pro tips, you're supporting my small business and I'm very grateful for it. It helps me do what I love and give back the sport that has given so much to me. #shopsmall #mdmcoaching #moocrew #moonation ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: PBA Regional Insights

This past weekend, I bowled the PBA South Regional Member/Non-Member event with Shawn Naumann. We took second place, after 8 games of qualifying Saturday and 10 games of baker match play Sunday before hitting the stepladder finals. We won our first two matches but lost the final to Walter Ray Williams Jr. and Josh Johnson. When you are bowling in an event like a PBA regional, it can be a grind both mentally and physically. It’s very important to be prepared:

🎳 Practice: You need to practice in advance – I bowled every day the week leading up to the event.

🎳 Equipment: come in with proper surface preparations and layouts. PBA events give you the opportunity to bring an unlimited amount of balls, which can be just as hurtful as helpful. I personally brought 9 balls into the tournament but only ended up using 3. After a few games of practice, you probably know what will work.

🎳 Managing your Mental Game: The main thing about a long format tournament is to not have too many highs and too many lows. If you throw a bad shot or have a bad game, you can’t be too hard on yourself. If you get too excited, you could get your adrenaline going too much. Match play was a unique format due to baker. Years prior were 10-pin doubles games. This year was all team handicap on Sunday. One bowler bowls the odd frames, and the other bowls even. I bowled even frames to finish the tenth. I had to have my head in the game enough to understand my ball reaction and make decisions about who bowls when. My ball reaction dropped off, so we switched, and Shawn finished the games at the end. That was a good decision.

PBA regionals can be very intimidating, especially if you don’t bowl them very often. If you decide to bowl a tournament of this caliber, the best thing to do to lower the intimidation factor is to be prepared. It’s not a show up and hope for the best situation. If you’re about to bowl your first one, talk to someone who does this often and pick their brain. When you’re unprepared, the situations become exponentially worse, especially when you might bowl against guys who have been on tv, hall of famers, and other titlists. Remember that at the end of the day, it’s still bowling. It’s 10 pins, a lane, and an oil pattern. The greatest enemy is going to be yourself. If you’re not prepared, you can’t fix that in that middle. Control what you can. Don’t dwell on it – even if it’s good. Just bowl. #mdmcoaching #protipfriday #iambowlersmart #moocrew #moonation #pba
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Happy Thanksgiving! I'm grateful for your support of my small business and wish every one of my followers lots of turkeys! ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Maximize your Black Friday shopping by purchasing a coaching session for a friend, loved one, or yourself! One hour session gift certificates for $65 and larger packages available. Stop by the shop or message me to get one! #mdmcoaching #bowling #holidayshopping #moocrew #coachedbythemoo #moonation ...

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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Walking Straight? Bowlers have always thought that walking towards their target was the right thing to do. The problem is that if you walk towards your target (for a right-hander, it’s normally to your right), you’re essentially walking in front of your swing. If you walk in front of your swing, two things will happen 1) you’ll hit your leg or ankle or 2) your elbow has to come out away from your shoulder so you do not hit yourself. In the video on top, you can see that my leg is clearly in the way of my swing. It can cause direction problems, inaccuracies, release problems, and generally results in poor execution.

You can’t consistently hit a target by walking right (this tip is written about right-handed bowlers, but please reverse this if you are left-handed). 80% of people that I help walk right, so this is one of the top three things that I look at when I meet somebody. I see where they start and where they end. If they end right of their start, we work on that immediately. No professional bowler that you see on TV or bowls for a living walks to the right: they drift left now.

In order to deliver a “straight” and ”proper” arm swing, you need to drift left away from your target to get your leg out of the way. That means that in a five-step approach, your even steps must walk in front of your left foot for a crossover step that helps achieve the balance beam technique. When you’re working on this, you want to end anywhere from 1-5 boards left of your start. When you’re practicing this, put a piece a tape on the board that you are starting on. Then put a piece of tape on the board 3-5 left so you can more easily visualize your path. An important note is that as a right-hander, you should be lining your targeting system up with your left foot because that’s the foot you end on. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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11 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: More hook with less effort
If you look at your bowling ball as the earth, the middle of your grip all the way around is the equator. Your fingers should be close to or under the equator of the ball at the point of release. This position creates proper leverage. Because your hand is facing your target, it also supports a more consistent release towards it. The professionals work the inside of the ball this way to create maximum leverage with minimal effort. When your hand is on the outside of the bowling ball, you have “less ball” to create power. If you want to increase rev rate without muscling, your hand needs to behind and under the bowling ball at the point of release.

I’ve noticed that a lot of bowlers who average between 150 and 190 have their hand on the outside of the ball. Because their hand is coming out of the ball prematurely, they hang up, stick, or grab. A lot of times when I’m working with students who are struggling to understand what I’m talking about, I’ll do drills. First, I tell them to start at the ball return and envision using their hand to throw a back-up ball. 90% of the time after they are done with this drill, their hand is in the proper leveraged position. Next, I’ll have them throw a back up ball at the line with a no-step or one-step drill to reinforce the right position.

Be careful if you do these drills because it is easy to grab the ball, which could lead to injury. I’d recommend starting slow and easy and working your way up. Sometimes, I’ll have my students do the ball return drill without even having their thumb in the ball. If you have tried this for 3-4 weeks and you’re not getting results, focus on staying behind the ball with your fingers under the equator. I always recommend working with an experienced coach when you’re trying to change something and that’s especially true if you have physical concerns. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #bowling
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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Great bowling, Kyle! This is the first of many sanctioned 700s. ...

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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Proud of my friend and student Robert Frank Mitchell for his first 300 as an adult and his new high series of 770! Great bowling! #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart ...

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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Coaching is a hard job. People want instant results but real progress often takes time - and a lot of practice. I had the privilege of seeing many years of hard work pay off this week for two of my long time students - Jevanine Zepeda and Jordan Walker - at the Florida High School Athletic Association state tournament. It took strong performances from both of them in districts to even qualify for states, and many games to make it through the tournament (individual or team qualifying then match play). Despite this pressure, Jordan bowled great and won her first match! Jev shot her highest game ever and qualified 4th! I couldn't be prouder of how these young women showed up when it mattered and bowled exceptionally well. They have worked so hard and I can't wait to see them achieve their next goals. #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart ...

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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Fingertip vs Conventional Fit

There are two general types of bowling ball fittings: conventional and fingertip. Almost every beginner bowler starts with conventional because 1) it gets their fingers deeper in the bowling ball, so they have more control over it to begin with 2) it allows them to hone their fundamentals: footwork, follow-through, and hitting a target. Conventional grip is closer to a house ball except that the holes are tighter and fitted to their hand. If you want to determine if your bowling ball is fitted conventionally, the key difference is that your middle finger and ring finger will go all the way to the second set of knuckles. This will give you very little to no hook on the bowling ball because you do not have separation time from your thumb and fingers coming out. On a conventional ball, your fingers are coming out closer to the same time as your thumb, limiting rotation.

So what about fingertip? It’s predominately used for when people want to step up their game and learn how to hook the bowling ball. It allows the bowling ball to curve at the pin at an angle to knock more pins down. Fingertip bowling is more common among league and tournament bowlers. We usually do this later, as it’s more advantageous to learn how to throw a hook ball after you’ve got your fundamentals down. The fitting of the fingertip style bowling is pretty straightforward, your fingers only go down to the first set of knuckles, allowing them to stay in the ball longer. When your hand is more spread out, you will create more rotation and leverage because your thumb will come out earlier than your fingers.

Of course, there are exceptions to these rules in fitting styles. Not everybody fits the mold. One example is two-handed bowlers. For them, I personally try to fit two-handed bowlers who want to progress in a conventional style because it allows the bowler to roll the ball on to their wrist and support it more easily. Look at the people who have been successful: Jason Belmonte and Osku Palermo both have conventional grips. However, some two-handed bowlers have fingertip grip, like Kyle Troup. Everyone is different. Another type of fitting is Sarge Easter, which is a hybrid of conventional and fingertip grip. I only recommend it on injured hands. If you’re learning to hook the ball but have an injury, this might be the right approach. It means that the ring finger is conventional but middle finger is fingertip. It alleviates pressure on the hand in some cases depending on the injury.

To determine what you are comfortable with, I suggest trying different fittings as long as they won’t affect your hand or cause injury. If you’re a traditional bowler who wants to look to hook the ball, I generally suggest fingertip. This is very unique to each individual and having a relationship with your PSO is incredibly important in being able to get the right fit. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart #bowling
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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Congratulations Jordan Walker on her new high series: 716! Awesome bowling! ...

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12 months ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Pulling Down

An ideal swing is an efficient swing. A lot of times, I see people force the bowling ball in to a spot on to the lane and miss their target. This is a very common tendency. What ends up happening is that they grab the ball at the top of the swing and pull it down from there, also known as a steep swing. Why is that bad? Your hand locks up in the ball more and you end up decelerating out of it. When you muscle your swing in this way, you might feel like you’re throwing it faster but you can’t create the same speed with your arm as you will with momentum from gravity, especially when you disrupt the flow. In addition to losing efficiency, injuries can happen because of this – tendinitis, blisters on your thumb, forearm soreness.

How do you know if you’re doing this? If, over time, the bowling ball feels heavier than when you first started bowling that day, it’s an indication that you’re using the muscles in your arms vs momentum. Another indication is that your bowling ball could be hooking in different parts of the lane. An example is if you feel like you threw a really good ball but it’s not reacting the same. It could be because the ball goes in to the lane at a steeper angle off your hand, causing the ball to hook early or roll out. Another indication is that your shoulder could be hurting after bowling. People who normally pull the ball down from the top use their shoulder too much, which can cause soreness.

If you feel like you are one of these people who pull the ball down, there are a number of drills that you can do to work on it. One of my favorite drills is a set-up swing drill. Basically, when you’re in your set-up, before you take your first step, you want to push the ball out as far as possible, then let gravity take the ball, and let the weight of your ball swing your arm. Do this 2-3 times, then set up and go without thinking too much. You don’t want to try to lower your swing. You don’t want to try to muscle anything in this drill.

As always, there’s no replacement for good help. I recommend getting time with a qualified coach to help you assess if you’re pulling the ball down and how to fix it. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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1 years ago

MDM Coaching

Another district champ - very proud to be your coach Jordan Walker! ...

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1 years ago

MDM Coaching

Congrats MJ! Proud to be your coach and ball driller!Isabella Pohl & Marvin Estor 🎳 boys & girls district individual champs! ...

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1 years ago

MDM Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Are you far enough left?

When you are bowling on a typical house shot or league pattern, the oil on the lane is going to change throughout the night because today's equipment absorbs oil. Bowling has become a game of adjustments to keep the ball in the pocket. One big variable that I see is that people usually don’t move their feet fast enough during league. Typical leagues consist of 4-person teams. Therefore, 7 other people are bowling on your pair, usually throwing aggressive equipment that changes the oil fast. Every house pattern has oil in the middle of the lane and it’s dry on the outside. If you start striking and the lanes change and you don’t move your feet fast enough, the ball hooks too early, gets in to the dry fast, and your ball “burns up” and doesn’t hit the pins hard enough. The most common leave that I start seeing when that happens is a 10 pin. A lot of times that means that your ball is losing axis rotation and rolling off the pin deck over the 9-pin. Another thing that can happen is that your miss area shrinks, so a ball slightly off target will react more strongly than you expect. A big reason for that is that you are not far enough left on the lane and you’re no longer in the oil.

If you move left, there is usually more oil in the front part of the lane so your ball can go through the 3 phases of ball motion. Moving into fresher oil and creating more angle for the ball to retain energy may mean that you should slow your ball speed down to give the ball time to react. You also want to consider shifting your eyes left. When you’re moving into more oil, if you look at the same target, your ball will hit the right faster, which defeats the purpose of that adjustment. One note is that a lot of people misread their ball reaction and it seems like the lanes are getting oilier as the night goes on or that they need to move right if the ball is not getting to the pocket the same way. No lanes get oilier as the night goes on. When you’re seeing your ball start to leave corner pins as it hits the pocket after you had been striking, you should assume burning up and you need to move left into more oil. You should also consider whether it’s worth starting your night further left so you need to make fewer moves. For more info, check out previous pro tips on the phases of ball motion. Note that lefties should switch these notes and consider moving right and this general guidance doesn’t apply to other oil patterns that dictate adjusting differently. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart
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